Can I have soup?

Soup is a tricky one. It typically contains a mixture of food categories, such as protein and vegetables and possibly grain, too (for example, barley beef soup with vegetables). Plus, there’s all the broth. This makes it nearly impossible to weigh. For this reason, Susan doesn’t eat soup at home. She does, however, eat lentil soup or vegetarian chili if she’s out at a restaurant and counts it for her protein serving. Typically, she just uses the bowl as her measurement and eats what they serve her.

If you absolutely love soup and would be heartbroken not to be able to eat it at home, don’t despair. Just because Susan doesn’t eat it doesn’t mean you can’t. You’ll have to plan ahead and do some creative math, though.

In general, for soup that has a broth that is on the thick side, a serving could contain 4 oz. protein, 6 oz. vegetables, and 2 oz. broth, for a total of 12 oz.

In general, for soup that has a broth that is on the thin side, a serving could contain 4 oz. protein, 6 oz. vegetables, and 4 oz. broth, for a total of 14 oz.

For soups that are broth-based (in other words, very thin), you may strain the vegetable and/or protein content, and then weigh according to your food plan portions. Add back in 8 oz. of broth afterwards.

Please be aware that these measurements are based on the standard Weight-Loss Food Plan. If your food plan is different, make sure you add in your usual protein amount, your usual vegetable amount, and 2 oz. or 4 oz. of broth, depending on the thickness you desire. For example, with a variation on the above where you’re using beans, the protein amount would be 6 oz., not 4 oz.